CommanderBond.net
  1. The Blades Library Book Club: Role Of Honour

    Welcome back to The Blades Library Book Club – the place for quality discussions of the books of James Bond!

    UK First Edition Role of Honour

    Role Of Honour UK First Edition

    Every two months a James Bond 007 novel is chosen for the club members to read. A thread is posted in the club forums listing locations on where you can find the novel. Discussions about the book will go on as the book is read and when it is finished. Another thread will be created so that club members can post their review and give a rating on the current book.

    All fans of the Literary Bond are eligible for membership. All you need to do to sign up is register on the CBn Forums (it’s free and only takes a minute) and then post your name in the sign up thread.

    The Book Club’s Nineteenth Book

    Currently we are progressing though the James Bond 007 novels in chronological order, since quite a number of members are using the club as an opportunity to read the books for the very first time. The club has just finished all fourteen of the Ian Fleming novels as well as the one-time-only Bond novel by Kingsley Amis, Colonel Sun. Most recently, the club moved onto the John Gardner era, and now continues with his fourth novel: Role Of Honour.

    Obtaining The Book

    Ordering online should be fairly easy. Role Of Honour can be ordered online (although in used condition) from the following sources:

    Discuss other places to buy Role Of Honour or where you got your copy in this thread.

    Discuss The Book While Reading

    Want to talk about the book while reading it? Post a new thread in The Blades Library.

    Review And Rate The Book

    After you have finished reading Role Of Honour, you can discuss it with other club members in The Blades Library, and give the book your personal rating out of five in this thread.

    If you have any questions or suggestions just post them in a new thread. Happy reading.

    *New* Archive Of All Past Read Books

    Additionally, club members can review or comment on any of the past read books in the club any time they want. Click here for the full archive of the past read books in the club.

    Previous Books Read

    Devin Zydel @ 2007-02-19
  2. The Blades Library Book Club: Icebreaker

    Welcome back to The Blades Library Book Club – the place for quality discussions of the books of James Bond!

    2003 Reprint Of First Three John Gardner 007 Novels

    2003 Reprint Of First Three John Gardner 007 Novels

    Every two months a James Bond 007 novel is chosen for the club members to read. A thread is posted in the club forums listing locations on where you can find the novel. Discussions about the book will go on as the book is read and when it is finished. Another thread will be created so that club members can post their review and give a rating on the current book.

    All fans of the Literary Bond are eligible for membership. All you need to do to sign up is register on the CBn Forums (it’s free and only takes a minute) and then post your name in the sign up thread.

    The Book Club’s Eighteenth Book

    Currently we are progressing though the James Bond 007 novels in chronological order, since quite a number of members are using the club as an opportunity to read the books for the very first time. The club has just finished all fourteen of the Ian Fleming novels as well as the one-time-only Bond novel by Kingsley Amis, Colonel Sun. Most recently, the club moved onto the John Gardner era, and now continues with his third novel: Icebreaker.

    Obtaining The Book

    Ordering online should be fairly easy. Icebreaker can be ordered online (although in used condition) from the following sources:

    Discuss other places to buy Icebreaker or where you got your copy in this thread.

    Discuss The Book While Reading

    Want to talk about the book while reading it? Post a new thread in The Blades Library.

    Review And Rate The Book

    After you have finished reading Icebreaker, you can discuss it with other club members in The Blades Library, and give the book your personal rating out of five in this thread.

    If you have any questions or suggestions just post them in a new thread. Happy reading.

    *New* Archive Of All Past Read Books

    Additionally, club members can review or comment on any of the past read books in the club any time they want. Click here for the full archive of the past read books in the club.

    Previous Books Read

    Devin Zydel @ 2006-12-15
  3. The Blades Library Book Club: For Special Services

    Welcome back to The Blades Library Book Club – the place for quality discussions of the books of James Bond!

    2003 Reprint Of First Three John Gardner 007 Novels

    2003 Reprint Of First Three John Gardner 007 Novels

    Every two months a James Bond 007 novel is chosen for the club members to read. A thread is posted in the club forums listing locations on where you can find the novel. Discussions about the book will go on as the book is read and when it is finished. Another thread will be created so that club members can post their review and give a rating on the current book.

    All fans of the Literary Bond are eligible for membership. All you need to do to sign up is register on the CBn Forums (it’s free and only takes a minute) and then post your name in the sign up thread.

    The Book Club’s Seventeenth Book

    Currently we are progressing though the James Bond 007 novels in chronological order, since quite a number of members are using the club as an opportunity to read the books for the very first time. The club has just finished all fourteen of the Ian Fleming novels as well as the one-time-only Bond novel by Kingsley Amis, Colonel Sun. Most recently, the club moved onto the John Gardner era, and now continues with his second novel: For Special Services.

    Obtaining The Book

    Ordering online should be fairly easy. For Special Services can be ordered online (although in used condition) from the following sources:

    Discuss other places to buy For Special Services or where you got your copy in this thread.

    Discuss The Book While Reading

    Want to talk about the book while reading it? Post a new thread in The Blades Library.

    Review And Rate The Book

    After you have finished reading For Special Services, you can discuss it with other club members in The Blades Library, and give the book your personal rating out of five in this thread.

    If you have any questions or suggestions just post them in a new thread. Happy reading.

    *New* Archive Of All Past Read Books

    Additionally, club members can review or comment on any of the past read books in the club any time they want. Click here for the full archive of the past read books in the club.

    Previous Books Read

    Devin Zydel @ 2006-10-15
  4. The Blades Library Book Club: Licence Renewed

    Welcome back to The Blades Library Book Club – the place for quality discussions of the books of James Bond!

    Every two months a James Bond 007 novel is chosen for the club members to read. A thread is posted in the club forums listing locations on where you can find the novel. Discussions about the book will go on as the book is read and when it is finished. Another thread will be created so that club members can post their review and give a rating on the current book.

    All fans of the Literary Bond are eligible for membership. All you need to do to sign up is register on the CBn Forums (it’s free and only takes a minute) and then post your name in the sign up thread.

    The Book Club’s Sixteenth Book

    Currently we are progressing though the James Bond 007 novels in chronological order, since quite a number of members are using the club as an opportunity to read the books for the very first time. The club has just finished all fourteen of the Ian Fleming novels as well as the one-time-only Bond novel by Kingsley Amis, Colonel Sun. The club will be moving onto the John Gardner era, starting with his first: Licence Renewed.

    Obtaining The Book

    Ordering online should be fairly easy. Licence Renewed can be ordered online (although in used condition) from the following sources:

    Discuss other places to buy Licence Renewed or where you got your copy in this thread.

    Discuss The Book While Reading

    Want to talk about the book while reading it? Post a new thread in The Blades Library.

    Review And Rate The Book

    After you have finished reading Licence Renewed, you can discuss it with other club members in The Blades Library, and give the book your personal rating out of five in this thread.

    If you have any questions or suggestions just post them in a new thread. Happy reading.

    *New* Archive Of All Past Read Books

    Additionally, club members can review or comment on any of the past read books in the club any time they want. Click here for the full archive of the past read books in the club.

    Previous Books Read

    Devin Zydel @ 2006-08-15
  5. Looking Back: COLD

    In May 1996, John Gardner’s fourteenth original James Bond 007 novel, COLD (published as Cold Fall in the US) was published. This James Bond novel was the author’s last, making a grand total of sixteen continuation novels and novelizations in the Gardner era. CBn takes a look back at Cold with release dates, publication blurbs, trivia, and forum reactions.

    UK First Edition Hardback

    UK First Edition Hardback

    In this white-knuckle 007 thriller, John Gardner leads master spy James Bond on a four-year search for terrorists in the skies – and into a deadly nest of doomsday killers.

    The night that Flight 229 is torn apart at Washington’s Dulles Airport, killing all 435 passengers aboard, a mission begins that will become an obsession for James Bond.

    Who is responsible for destroying the aircraft? Was it a straightforward act of terrorism against a British-owned symbol? An assassination aimed at only one person? A ruthless attempt to put the airline out of business? For Bond, only one of the victims matters: his former lover and old friend, the Principessa Sukie Tempesta.

    The search for Sukie’s killers will turn out to be the most complex and demanding assignment of Bond’s career. Across continents and through ever-changing labyrinths of evil, he follows the traces of clues into the centre of a fanatical society more deadly than any terrorist army. Its code name is COLD the Children of the Last Days. What he finds there is chilling indeed.

    UK First Edition Hodder & Stoughton Hardback

    Trivia

    • While generally known by the title of COLD, the novel was published as Cold Fall in the US.
    • The US edition of the book is split into two parts. The first part is set 1990 and the second in 1994, picking up where the previous novel, SeaFire left off. The UK edition omits all references to this two part structure.
    • This book has the smallest print run for a James Bond continuation novel in the UK at 900 copies.
    • The US paperback edition has a teaser for the next upcoming James Bond continuation novel, Zero Minus Ten, written by new author, Raymond Benson.

    Release Timeline

    • 1996: 1st British Hodder & Stoughton Hardback Edition
    • 1996: 1st American Putnam Hardback Edition
    • 1996: 1st British Coronet Paperback Edition
    • 1997: 1st American Berkley Paperback Edition
    • 1997: 1st British ISIS Large Print Edition

    Relationship to the film series

    • COLD: M is kidnapped when he makes a surprise appearance in the field.
    • The World Is Not Enough (1999) – M is kidnapped when she makes a surprise appearance in the field.
    • COLD: Bond performs a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop.
    • Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) – Bond performs a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) drop.
    • COLD: Sukie Tempesta gets Stockholm Syndrome, falls in love with the villain, and turns on Bond.
    • The World Is Not Enough (1999) – Elektra King gets Stockholm Syndrome, falls in love with the villain, and turns on Bond.

    Forum Reviews

    Well I read Cold Fall yesterday and let me tell you, I liked it a lot. It had a diffrent feel then a lot of the novels, and that was a good thing. I loved the division of two stories, the characters, and Bond preparing to meet the new M (plus the new relationship with the old M).

    CBn Forum member British Chap

    I find it really boring. Hard to finish. Some part are ok, like the jet ski chase. But the major part is generally tedious for me.

    CBn Forum member Cesari

    US First Edition Hardback

    US First Edition Hardback

    Cold Fall is an interesting finale to the Gardner cycle with some nice references to past books and a neat story structure that makes it stand out from the rest of the pack. I enjoyed the second half a little more than the first, particularly the last chapter when Bond leaves to meet with the new M. It’s not the best Gardner novel but it’s definitely one of the better ones in the later books.

    CBn Forum member Genrewriter

    Oh Lordy, another weirdo killing society with overt fascist tendencies led by yet another new Hitler.

    The most interesting aspect is that Gardner starts referencing his own characters, rather than continually harping back to Fleming (what he does with his characters is relentlessly odd, though); very strange book, basically goes nowhere and is a fitting end to the Gardner Bonds (this is not necessarily a compliment) – it is archetypal Gardner Bond.

    CBn Forum member Jim

    US First Edition Paperback

    US First Edition Paperback

    I wanted to punch myself in the face reading this ‘Children of the Last Days’ nonsense. Could’ve added a few pages developing COLD more, and it might’ve worked better.

    Hated the fact that… (spoiler, highlight to read) he brought back Sukie Tempesta, then killed her, then she wasn’t dead, then she died again, then she wasn’t dead again, but she was bad. …Huh? Then she wasn’t really bad, because she was crazy. Right.

    The storyline was OK, it was just a weak effort for a man who seems like he may have fallen asleep at his typewriter when he reached 220 pages or so, and then slapped together a quick ending.

    I was also bothered by the fact that ‘Book One’ ends with Gardner saying that COLD raised its ugly head unexpectedly. Then it never happened. I was expecting some huge terrorist action preceding a big showdown at the end, and it never materialized. Maybe I fell asleep reading it and never saw it.

    Could’ve been better, could’ve been worse. I guess what we got out of it was, it was time for Gardner to hang it up. Good riddance.

    CBn Forum member Jriv71

    I quite enjoyed COLD myself. One of Gardner’s more memorable of his second half. The villain organisation name ‘Children Of the Last Days’ still creeps me out. And I loved the way the book split in two.

    CBn Forum member Mister Asterix

    After reading the very good SeaFire I was really looking forward to this final novel by Gardner, but was I ever let down. The idea of splitting the book into two different parts is nice, but the story on the whole does not have alot going for it.

    The first half of the story is generally very boring, but the second half is somewhat better. On the whole, Gardner has written better, but the finale is a fitting end.

    CBn Forum member Qwerty

    Large Print Edition

    Large Print Edition

    Even as a Gardner fan I couldn’t in good conscience suggest anyone waste their time reading COLD, but I remember it having a couple of nice touches. I liked the way that Gardner, in the last chapter, sets up 007’s first meeting with M’s successor. You get a clear feeling that the new regime will be very different to what he’s been used to. And it was a nice idea having Bond at the controls of an attack helicopter. Wish EON had found a way to work that into GoldenEye.

    CBn Forum member Roebuck

    It’s his worst book, in my opinion. I’ve read it twice and I can’t remember a thing. I don’t know why it’s called COLD in the UK and Cold Fall in the US. Another strange difference is that the UK edition isn’t broken up into the “Book One, Book Two” sections. Too bad because that multi year leap in time at the midpoint is sort of the only thing I like about the book.

    CBn Forum member zencat

    The Looking Back at John Gardner Series:

    Related Articles:

    Devin Zydel @ 2005-09-06
  6. Looking Back: SeaFire

    In September 1994, John Gardner’s thirteenth original James Bond 007 novel, SeaFire was published. This Gardner Bond novel proved to be the author’s penultimate novel in his run as continuation author for the series. CBn takes a look back at SeaFire with release dates, publication blurbs, trivia, and forum reactions.

    UK First Edition Hardback

    UK First Edition Hardback

    A new Double-O Section has risen from the ashes of the old British Secret Service. Now, the entire organisation has been split up and the Double-O section reports to a small government committee called MicroGlobe One. Gone are the days when James Bond was answerable only to M. Gone also is the old licence to kill, for the new section’s targets are not individuals but large corporations. Gone is the automatic pistol, replaced by the pocket calculator.

    But weapons are reinstated when Bond is put on the trail of the self-made billionaire, Sir Maxwell Tarn, whose business empire spans the globe, and whose activities appear to include illegal dealing in weapons on a grand global scale.

    With the shrewd assistance of Flicka von Grusse, 007 follows a maze of trails from London to Spain, Israel and Germany. But they are on board Tarn’s floating laboratory off the coast of Puerto Rico when their own prey becomes their captor. There, Bond and Flicka realise their misstep has placed them squarely in the audience to a deadly experiment that will trigger ecological disaster of global proportions.

    The fate of the oceans, not to mention their own lives, lies in stopping Tarn before his cache of deadly weapons destroys much more than a few pristine islands in the Caribbean.”

    John Gardner proves once again his skills as a master story-teller in this latest 007 superadventure.

    UK First Edition Hodder & Stoughton Hardback

    Trivia

    • The US paperback of Never Send Flowers, the previous John Gardner James Bond novel, included a teaser for SeaFire, citing the upcoming villain as Sir Maxwell Lustig. However, the villain came to be known eventually as Sir Maxwell Tarn.

    Release Timeline

    • 1994: 1st British Hodder & Stoughton Hardback Edition
    • 1994: 1st American Putnam Hardback Edition
    • 1994: 1st British Bookclub Hardback Edition
    • 1995: 1st American Berkley Paperback Edition
    • 1995: 1st British Coronet Paperback Edition
    • 1996: 1st British Chivers Large Print Hardback Edition

    Relationship to the film series

    • SeaFire: Bond rides a high-powered motorcycle along the ramps and roofs of Roman ruins.
    • Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) – Bond rides a high-powered motorcycle along the ramps and roofs of a Vietnamese village.
    • SeaFire: The villain uses para-hawks to attack Bond.
    • The World Is Not Enough (1999) – The villain uses para-hawks to attack Bond.
    • SeaFire: The climax involves the use of a stolen Russian mini-sub in the Caribbean.
    • The World Is Not Enough (1999) – The climax involves the use of a stolen Russian mini-sub in the Black Sea.

    Forum Reviews

    Large Print Edition

    Large Print Edition

    Tried punching through this one last night to no avail.

    The story’s not so bad, it’s implausable that SIS could possibly be that incompetent to not know anything about Tarn’s dealings when he seems to have the drop on them.

    The Microglobe One story arc should never have been put forth, and the Two Zero section really sees a ordinary civil servant basically filing through papers and meeting with a general assembly. Bond’s part in all of this could be done by any average civil servant with a university degree.

    The character of Bond itself really is a joke. It shows that Gardner either, A: didn’t really know or care all that much about Fleming’s Bond, or B: chose to throw everything out about Bond and remould the character.

    The Bond in SeaFire really is an upper class, or trying to be snob. The dialogue between him and Flicka in particular reads nothing like Fleming’s novels. It’d be fine if it was a novel, with any lead character. It isn’t however what I believe a Bond novel should be, or aim to be. He’s certianlly got Fleming’s character throughout his 12 novels wrong.

    I also had trouble with the action sequences, for a former Royal Marine Gardner’s work lacks suspence, and there are no real insights into Bond’s thoughts or opinions throughout the entire novel.

    CBn Forum member 1q2w3e4r

    Microglobe One is probably the stupidest idea that Gardner ever had for the Bond series. I hated the idea. I’m also not a fan of Freddie, or Flicka, or whatever he’s calling her in this book. Bond girls, in my opinion, should not continue on book to book. Gardner really shouldn’t have been let anyway near the Bond series.

    CBn Forum member Brendan007

    US Proof

    US Proof

    I think it is a good Gardner book. I don’t like Bond being chief of “00” section and MI6 becoming “Micro Globe One” with a comitee directing it, nor Bond living for more than one year with the same girl (Flicka). That is too far from our usual Bond.

    But I like the plot, the characters, and especially the action scenes. The motorbike chase is cool, and the climax with parahawks is great.

    CBn Forum member Cesari

    It is the politically correct 90’s, Europe has been reunited, and James Bond is engaged to be married! To top it all off, Bond’s MI6 has been turned into a mangled committee called MicroGlobe One. While this is a huge change for Fleming’s Cold War creation it is necessary and just that things would change. SeaFire was a fast and excellent read. The villain was highly entertaining, and there were many turns in the story I did not see. For once the usual traitor was figured out early into the story and the story wasn’t based on one of the few plots Gardner likes to rehash. The book played like a Bond film with great action, the return of old faces, and a storyline less predictable than most.

    CBn Forum member chronicliar

    US First Edition Hardback

    US First Edition Hardrback

    I’ve always thought it was a slightly curious book; a lot of build up about the neo-Nazis and then the denouement takes a complete left turn and really has nothing to do with all of that. Seems a bit curious that if one cleans away an oilslick one somehow achieves political power. The two aspects don’t gel very well – oil and water indeed. Perhaps that’s the subtle joke in the construction of the book. Perhaps a little too subtle (i.e. non-existent…)

    I think it exemplifies what others have noticed about some – not all – of the Gardners; no real working through to an ending.

    Some interesting characters introduced at the end, as far as I recall – the practically savage woman who tortures thingy – but oddly a lot of that is kept “offscreen”; slightly out-of-focus. Even odder considering that some of the book is extremely violent.

    It’s OK but I’d be cautious to describe it as anything other than middling Gardner. As a typical example of the Gardner Bond – clumsy sex, globetrotting, twist and countertwist and a stripping away of some of the myth (Two Zeros? Bedford Square?) – it’s probably the most “conventional”. It’s not unenjoyable, and it’s a pleasant enough read and considerably more appealing than some of the update novels (Brokenclaw for example) but I’m not too sure what it really achieves.

    CBn Forum member Jim

    I think this is much better than Gardner’s “recent” work (pre-SeaFire.) This one had my interest throughout. I guess it’s not his fault, though, that he’s starting to repeat his villains’ motives. Yet another guy who wants to be the next Hitler. It was a well-told story, however.

    CBn Forum member Jriv71

    US First Edition Paperback

    US First Edition Paperback

    For various reasons, MicroGlobe One came across to me as one of Gardner’s more interesting, if annoying, elements of realism in his Bond mythos. It was a means of shifting the formula around, putting Bond up against an institutional foe of sorts at the same time he was battling a true villain, and adding some real world flavor to the proeedings.

    Granted, it’s been quite some time since I last read SeaFire. I hesitate to comment much on the plot and characters until I’ve read the book again. While I don’t recall the storyline very well, however, the action packed climax of the novel is burned into my mind. Pun intended. Max Tarn’s brutal death at the hands of a ruthless James Bond is fairly unforgettable, as is the state in which Bond finds his latest true love at the book’s end. Gardner’s world of 007 was, at times, certainly darker.

    CBn Forum member MicroGlobe One

    Again, like the previous Never Send Flowers, here is one of the late John Gardner novels that I really enjoyed reading. The action (and the book as a whole really) has a swift pace, and this was one of the Gardner novels I read through in the shortest amount of time.

    Sir Maxwell Tarn stands out as one of the more interesting and generally better Gardner villains in my opinion, as well as the case for Flicka. Terrific finale, made me want to start Cold right away.

    CBn Forum member Qwerty

    UK First Edition Paperback

    UK First Edition Paperback

    This isn’t among my favorite Gardner books. My main problem is that it doesn’t seem to be evenly paced. Throughout the whole book it seems like Bond is talking with MicroGlobe One, then goes off on a little mission, and returns to MicroGlobe One for a debriefing and another little chore to go on. I find it rather slow moving anytime I read it. Everything after Felix comes into the story is great, though. In my opinion, however, it has some really well written action scenes and Maxwell Tarn is a vile villain. Nice cliffhanger ending leading up into his last one.

    CBn Forum member RossMan

    It is one of the better Gardner books. Some great action and a few standout moments. Great climax too. MicroGlobe One, fiancée Flicka as Bond’s partner –yes, highly unconventional ideas for 007, but these ideas seemed to perk up Gardner and thus the book felt fresh. I remember feeling perked up myself about the series when I first read it. And a cliffhanger ending is always welcome (if for no other reason that it assures there will be another book).

    CBn Forum member zencat

    The Looking Back at John Gardner Series:

    Related Articles:

    Devin Zydel @ 2005-08-24
  7. Looking Back: Never Send Flowers

    In July 1993, John Gardner’s twelfth original James Bond novel, Never Send Flowers was published. This is one of the later John Gardner James Bond novels and one that is often held in more high regard than some of the others published around the same time. CBn takes a look back at Never Send Flowers with release dates, publication blurbs, trivia, and forum reactions.

    UK First Edition Hardback

    UK First Edition Hardback

    When Laura March, an officer of the British Security service, is murdered in Switzerland, James Bond is send to liaise with the local authorities. He teams up with the lovely and lively Flicka von Grosse, a member of Swiss Intelligence, and together they discover some curious information about Laura’s past.

    In turn, they become conscious of a link between the March murder and four recent, high-profile assassinations, in Rome, London, Paris, and Washington. They also discover a further connection between the assassinations and the internationally famous actor, David Dragonpol, who has retired early from a spectacular career and now lives in a castle on the Rhine, in which every room becomes a bizarre step into the past.

    But the past is dangerous, to Dragonpol, Bond and Flicka, and it leads them to a deadly game of hide and seek, following a sinister shadow across the world, from Athens to Milan, to Singapore, the United States and back to Europe for a denouement in the most unlikely setting of EuroDisney outside Paris.

    UK First Edition Hodder & Stoughton Hardback

    Trivia

    • Bond once again drives a Saab in Never Send Flowers, but it’s not the “Silver Beast.” This time it’s a Saab 9000 CD Turbo, which was the car Gardner owned while living in America.
    • In Gardner’s acknowledgments for Never Send Flowers he thanked Euro Disney for their co-operation in allowing him to use the wonderful Euro Disney facility as a backdrop to the final scenes in this book.
    • The US paperback of Never Send Flowers includes a teaser for John Gardner’s next original James Bond novel SeaFire, citing the upcoming villain as Sir Maxwell Lustig. However, the villain came to be known eventually as Sir Maxwell Tarn.

    Acknowledgments

    I must thank Senior Vice-President and Board of Euro Disney SA for their co-operation in allowing me to use the wonderful Euro Disney facility as a backdrop to the final scenes in this book.

    Particular thanks must go to my friend Jean Marie Gerbeauz, Vice-President, Communications, Euro Disney SA, for all his help in providing information.

    For the purposes of a work of fiction, and for complete security, I have played a little with the security arrangements at Euro Disney. Only those who know will spot these alterations which are minor, for this tremendous complex reamins one of the best Disney facilities in the world.

    John Gardner, Virginia 1992

    Release Timeline

    • 1993: 1st British Hodder & Stoughton Hardback Edition
    • 1993: 1st American Putnam Hardback Edition
    • 1994: 1st American Chivers Large Print Hardback Edition
    • 1994: 1st British Coronet Paperback Edition
    • 1994: 1st British Chivers Large Print Hardback Edition
    • 1994: 1st American Berkley Paperback Edition
    • 1996: 1st British Chivers Large Print Paperback Edition

    Relationship to the film series

    • Never Send Flowers: David Dragonpol uses a walking stick gun.
    • The World Is Not Enough (1999) – Valentin Zukovsky uses a walking stick gun.

    Forum Reviews

    UK First Edition Paperback

    UK Paperback

    I read this last year and I think it’s the worst Bond novel I’ve ever read. There’s no action, no thrills, and although there’re plenty of bedroom scenes between Bond and Flicka, there’s little chemistry. The villian is absolutely useless, and the plot is bored and tired. I’m sorry, but I think this spelled the end for Gardner and paved the way for Benson.

    CBn Forum member Digitarius

    I like the way Gardner tried to have Bond on a different type of case but the book is quite uneven. As a California native, I did get a great deal of amusement from Bond at Euro-Disney.

    CBn Forum member Genrewriter

    I thought the climax in was very weak. Bond in EuroDisney?

    CBn Forum member JAWS

    Large Print Edition

    Large Print Edition

    Gardner leaps on the mid-90s serial killer craze. Really quite an odd book (although not quite as weird as The Man from Barbarossa, nor quite as bad (just) as Brokenclaw). The novels plumb a pre-Benson depth with the comment about Bond’s admiration for the Disney corporation, which is one of the oddest things I’ve read in any of the books and doesn’t seem to fit in with the 007 of (say) Diamonds are Forever and his views on American culture.

    CBn Forum member Jim

    I thought it sucked. Well, maybe I’m just easily distracted by bad dialogue. Really, really brutal dialogue. The story was fine (I guess), but I can’t get past his dialogue anymore.

    I wanted to punch myself in the face when Bond starts with that ‘child-in-all-of-us’ bit about Disney. When was he ever at Disney? I guess this is really Gardner showing his age, and he really should’ve stopped writing Bond by this point. Again, the story was ok, but there was too much that I just couldn’t stomach. Bond is too sappy (now, every girl seems to be the one) and I don’t feel like I’m reading a James Bond story until M enters a scene. Really.

    CBn Forum member Jriv71

    US First Edition Hardback

    US First Edition Hardback

    I really enjoyed Never Send Flowers. It had one of the most clever villains of the series, certainly Gardner’s most memorable, for me anyway. The EuroDisney thing bugged me when I first read it, particularly because the only news I had ever heard of EuroDisney up to the point when this novel was released was that it was failing miserably and was likely going to close. I got over it though after reading just a paragraph or two farther. And I’ve always really like this title. For me, Never Send Flowers is second in Gardner titles to only Icebreaker. It speaks of death in a clever way without using the words DIE, DEATH, or KILL.

    CBn Forum member Mister Asterix

    Easily one of the better novels from the later John Gardner era. Here we have a relatively simple plot that works. Alot of Gardner’s plots tend to have swift turns, many double-crosses and on the whole, can be quite complex. In this case, I find Never Send Flowers to be much more level and because of that, it works very well.

    I was pleased with the Bond girl in Flicka and villain in Dragonpol in this book, as some of his others can be less memorable. I think the locations and mood are evoked to a greater depth in this book compared to some of his others, again something that helps. On the whole, I highly recommend this novel to any fan of the literary 007.

    CBn Forum member Qwerty

    Yes, this was a (another) great Bond book by John Gardner. I thought this was his last really terrific book before ending his run on the series. Top notch villain, one of my favorites from the Gardner era, and an interesting girl. Though, I’m not too fond of the idea of Flicka returning in the next two books, though it did set up the terrific cliffhanger ending in SeaFire.

    CBn Forum member RossMan

    US Paperback Edition

    US Paperback Edition

    I really hated Never Send Flowers when it first came out. Another Gardner disappointment, I thought. But I recently re-read it (as I did all the Gardner books) and while I still think it’s a weak entry in the Gardner canon, I found it was not as bad as I remembered. I sensed that Gardner was going for a Bond horror story with this book. At least that’s how it starts out. There’s lots of references to Bond feeling “spooked”, and Gardner goes to great lengths to create “eerie” atmosphere with the castle, etc. Of course, it kind of goes wacky with ending the book at EuroDisney — but I do like the motif of the imaginary world that runs through the book. I don’t know, I now kind of like Never Send Flowers for what it TRIES to be. My biggest complaint is the MASSIVE amount of superfluous exposition we get about Dragonpol’s brother, etc. Very Gardner.

    CBn Forum member zencat

    The Looking Back at John Gardner Series:

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    Devin Zydel @ 2005-08-15
  8. Looking Back: Death Is Forever

    In July 1992, following the very fan-controversial The Man From Barbarossa, came Death Is Forever, the eleventh John Gardner James Bond novel. CBn takes a look back with release dates, publication blurbs, trivia, and forum reactions regarding Death Is Forever.

    UK First Edition Hardback

    UK First Edition Hardback

    John Gardner’s eleventh original novel featuring Ian Fleming’s indestructible hero sees James Bond plunged into the dangerous, shadowy world of post-Cold-War Europe.

    Before the Berlin Wall fell, Cabal has been the most extensive and successful Western Intelligence network in the Eastern bloc. With the coming of Europe’s unexpected peace, its local agents were expected to go to ground — but to the consternation of their MI6 and CIA controllers death stalks them still.

    When case officers sent to track down the surviving Cabal agents are killed in mysterious circumstances, James Bond — together with the CIA’s Elizabeth Zara (henceforward known in the American vernacular as ‘Easy’) — are sent to pick up the pieces of the investigation, and before long they are on the trail of a fanatical Communist spymaster and a terrifying conspiracy to turn back the tide of European democracy.

    With a tension-packed train journey across Europe and a denouement at the new Channel Tunnel, John Gardner shows why, as the Daily Telegraph said of an earlier novel, “Ian Fleming would not be displeased.”

    UK First Edition Hodder & Stoughton Hardback

    Trivia

    • Despite the UK publisher being “dead set against it,” John Gardner insisted that the AIDS epidemic be addressed in this Bond novel. Hence, James Bond practices “safe sex” for the first (and last) time.
    • Gardner used the villain’s moniker, “the poison dwarf” for another character in Nobody Lives Forever, and also in one of his Boysie Oakes novels.
    • John Gardner includes the word ‘death’ in every chapter title except for the last which is simply titled ‘R.I.P.’.
    • James Bond is offered a knighthood at the end of this book (which he refuses).
    • As a marketing afterthought, a blue sticker was affixed to all US Putnam hardcover editions announcing the book as a ” SUPER VALUE! Bond Is Back.”

    Release Timeline

    • 1992: 1st British Hodder & Stoughton Hardback Edition
    • 1992: 1st American Putnam Hardback Edition
    • 1992: 1st American Bookclub Hardback Edition
    • 1993: 1st British Coronet Paperback Edition
    • 1993: 1st British Chivers Large Print Hardback Edition
    • 1993: 1st American Berkley Paperback Edition
    • 1994: 1st British Chivers Large Print Paperback Edition

    Relationship to the film series

    …no similarities between this book and the films, but isn’t it interesting that this book was published when EON was embroiled in legal issues over 007 and no film was being developed?

    Forum Reviews

    I just started Death Is Forever, which I find a very nice read. It’s more of a spy story then a Bond movie.

    CBn Forum member chimera01

    I like it, it’s not too bad considering there are more twists in the book than a pretzel factory. It has a good villain and enough action to keep the mind occupied, unlike Scorpius which seems to meander from time to time.

    CBn Forum member Genrewriter

    Large Print Edition

    Large Print Edition

    Oh look, there are some real people. Again. The Death Is Forever spider sandwich scene is satisfyingly nasty. Even if it is part of yet another long sequence in a hotel room. Interesting twist in Death Is Forever to have Bond completely fail in his mission. Only he comes back alive. OK, so he saves the world but that’s incidental. Quite a bit of whizzing about Europe in this, so it comes across as fast moving but it’s hard to remember any particular incident and in essence it’s a tired re-run of No Deals, Mr Bond. Ooh, there’s a traitor. Erm…hasn’t that happened before?

    CBn Forum member Jim

    US First Edition Hardback

    US First Edition Hardback

    I just re-read it, and I liked it. I liked the similarities to No Deals, Mr. Bond, and Bond was really clever in this one. Some of Gardner’s other ones, he’s getting bailed out all the time by other people, but not here. I love the way he killed Weisen, who is my favorite Gardner villain. He would have been a really fun ally of Bond’s, if written that way. He should have been introduced earlier in the book, he needed more “screen time”.

    A couple of things, though. Is this where Gardner starts showing his age? I was really annoyed by yet another Sean Connery reference, and that whole business where Bond says he was once compared to Hoagy Carmichael.
    The two times Bond’s love interests make him wear a condom, didn’t really bother me, it’s P.C. and all that, but it just seemed juvenile the way it was brought up.

    I’m just fearful that Gardner is starting to show his age and I’ll be reading the ramblings of an old man.

    CBn Forum member Jriv71

    The second half of the John Gardner series of Bond novels is instead much more fun. Great stories like Win, Lose Or Die, Death Is Forever, The Man From Barbarossa and Never Send Flowers.

    One of Gardners better ones actually…

    CBn Forum member Kronsteen

    US Paperback Edition

    US Paperback Edition

    Ahhh…here we have one of the higher points in the rollercoaster of highs and lows of the later books in the John Gardner era. Many fans seem to often compare this novel here to No Deals, Mr. Bond, which is somewhat less enjoyable to read compared to Death Is Forever in my opinion. I definitely recommend Gardner Bond fans to pick this one up.

    CBn Forum member Qwerty

    I have to say I prefer No Deals, Mr. Bond. I found this book to be nothing more than a rehash of No Deals, Mr. Bond, which is one of my favourite Gardner novels, it had the same basic plot, same type of characters, etc. And did anyone care when Easy dies?

    CBn Forum member scaramanga

    UK Paperback Edition

    UK Paperback Edition

    I found this novel to be an interesting read to say the least.

    The plot was constantly changing and the characters were cofusing, each having about three names each, and each used after the other, so that was quite confusing.

    It began slowely and only picked up slightly near the end, this was mainly due to the un-needed detail on every aspect of everything.

    CBn Forum member Tehuti 004

    I like it better than No Deals, Mr. Bond, but it’s not really one of my favorite Gardner novels.

    CBn Forum member zencat

    The Looking Back at John Gardner Series:

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    Devin Zydel @ 2005-08-06
  9. Looking Back: The Man From Barbarossa

    In August of 1991 John Gardner’s tenth James Bond novel, The Man From Barbarossa, a particular 007 novel which has divided fans in their opinion of it for many years. CBn takes a look back with release dates, publication blurbs, trivia, and forum reactions at the author’s personal favourite of his James Bond novels.

    The Man From Barbarossa UK First Edition Hardback

    UK First Edition Hardback

    A case of mistaken identities pits 007 against a new breed of international terrorists in John Gardner’s tenth contribution to the best-selling James Bond series.

    When Joel Penderek is kidnapped from his New Jersey home, the unknown clandestine Russian organization The Scales of Justice takes credit for the abduction. Claiming that Penderek is really Josif Vorontsov, a Ukrainian who had a hand in the infamous Babi Yar massacre and later served with devastating brutality as a guard at the Polish death camp of Sobibor, The Scales Of Justice vows to bring Penderek to trial.

    But before the group can do so, James Bond receives word that the undergound movement has snatched the wrong man. The real Vorontsov lives in Florida, where he has been under Israeli surveillance. Further complications arise when The Scales of Justice begins a killing spree within the most secret and protected ranks of the Russian military. Clearly, the renegade group has infiltrated the Kremlin itself, but nobody knows to what end until Bond and his international team of undercover operatives, including the luscious Nina Bibikova, discover a plot by the mastermind behind the criminals, a villain so ruthless that his unscrupulous motives will subject the world to an extreme and unbelievable horror unless Bond can stop him first.

    Fraught with nerve-racking deception, explosive action, and double-cross after double-cross, The Man From Barbarossa is a slam-bang thriller that will leave the reader breathless.

    US First Edition Hardback

    Trivia

    • John Gardner names The Man From Barbarossa as the best of all his James Bond novels. It was also, apparently, the favourite of Glidrose. But the American publisher was not as happy with the book complaining it had strayed too far from the formula.
    • It was reported the reason a different 007 silhouette was used on the U.S. cover of TMFB was because Eon complained that the image Putnam had been using (most recently on Brokenclaw) looked too much like Pierce Brosnan. The “Bond of record” in 1991 was Timothy Dalton.

    Release Timeline

    • 1991: 1st British Hardback Edition
    • 1991: 1st American Putnam Hardback Edition
    • 1991: 1st British Coronet Paperback Edition
    • 1992: 1st American Berkley Paperback Edition
    • 1992: 1st American Eagle Large Print/Chivers Large Print Edition
    • 1992: 1st American John Curley Large Print Edition

    Relationship to the film series

    • The Man From Barbarossa: Baku, Azerbaijan is a major location.
    • The World Is Not Enough (1999) – Baku, Azerbaijan is a major location.

    Forum Reviews

    I don’t like this book at all. So boring.

    CBn Forum member Cesari

    The Man From Barbarossa Large Print Edition

    Large Print Edition

    The Man From Barbarossa Rules! I’ve told this before, and I’m telling this now. Ok, it has some regular Gardner flaws, like his favourite loose ends and far-fetched double-crosses, and I admit that the villain is somewhat weak, but on the other hand, it IS a spy-thriller (!), full of thrilling cloak-n-dagger details.

    Some people say the pace of the plot is too slow. Hey! Those must re-read Casino Royale and Moonraker. Too fast for you?

    Besides, I’m Russian, and I like the way Gardner describes this country of the 90s.

    CBn Forum member Grubozaboyschikov

    I think it would work better without the requisite villainous scheme tacked on to the end. Seems to start off with a Soviet coup and show trials, and ends up something about the Gulf War. The two (three?) elements didn’t hang together, in the scales of justice.

    And once again, we have Bond seconded to a group of foreign agents, one or more of whom may not be entirely trustworthy.

    Yet another one where John didn’t know quite how to end it.

    CBn Forum member Jim

    I think if I hadn’t been so rushed in reading this one, I may have enjoyed it more. I certainly don’t hate this book, but this isn’t one I plan on re-reading many times over in the future.

    CBn Forum member Johnboy007

    The Man From Barbarossa Czech Edition

    Czech Edition

    Go ahead, starting ripping me a new one. I like this book. I do. I just left another thread discussing Gardner, and a recurring thought came to me…I like Gardner much better when he tries to be like LeCarre (or ends up that way), rather than like Fleming (which he cannot), or the screenwriters who need to give the Bond villain a limp, or a deformity, or the overdone evil lair, with a helo-pad.

    Fleming never overdid the now-famous hollowed out volcano, that was the writers/producers of the films. When Gardner’s books do that, I tend to tune out a bit. This book was reminiscent of Nobody Lives Forever or No Deals, Mr. Bond (not completely, just in small ways) or some of LeCarre’s stuff (of course not nearly as complex); it just had James Bond acting like a spy, or looking for Russians or other spies. (He’s a spy.) In the wake of so-called ‘Glasnost’ there are now good Russians and bad Russians, throw in the Holocaust angle (always fun), and Bond working with the French, KGB and Mossad, and you don’t need to over-do the bad guy.

    This is probably my favorite Gardner novel. It’s the only one I remembered much about after having read them over a decade ago. I can usually gauge my interest by, how long it takes me to read it, and this was a page-turner. Never fell asleep reading it on the subway.

    CBn Forum member Jriv71

    I did also enjoy The Man From Barbarossa very much. Not the typical Bond story, as you said, but still very intriguing and well-written.

    One of Gardners better ones actually…

    CBn Forum member Kronsteen

    The Man From Barbarossa US First Edition Hardback

    US First Edition Hardback

    Indeed, this is a case of love it or hate it. Personally, I completely disagree with the notion that The Man From Barbarossa is a failed experiment. It’s one of my personal favorite Gardner novels. In fact, I believe Gardner has said it is his favorite of all of his novels. One cannot become a slave to the 007 formula lest the whole game become stale. One thing is certain: The Man From Barbarossa is unique among the Bond canon.

    CBn Forum member MicroGlobe One

    I remember the one time I read this. I had only a few pages left at one point, and I couldn’t force myself to do it. I did read them later, but at a different sitting. I was completely bored by this book.

    CBn Forum member Neil S. Bulk

    Fleming, Amis, Pearson, Wood, Gardner, Benson, etc… this novel is my least favourite of them all. I’ve tried several times to like it: still haven’t succeeded. Perhaps sometime in the future.

    CBn Forum member Qwerty

    I’ve read it twice and I just can’t seem to get into it. That doesn’t mean it’s a bad Bond book. It just doesn’t work for me. But I’m happy to hear why people like this book because maybe that will help me see it in a different light.

    CBn Forum member zencat

    The Looking Back at John Gardner Series:

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    Devin Zydel @ 2005-07-23
  10. Looking Back: Brokenclaw

    In September of 1990 John Gardner’s ninth James Bond novel, Brokenclaw, the first 007 novel of the ’90’s was published. CBn takes a look back with release dates, publication blurbs, trivia, and forum reactions at the book that had Bond face off with the ‘half-Chinese, half-Indian, all evil’ Brokenclaw.

    Brokenclaw UK Hardback

    UK First Edition Hardback

    Brokenclaw is John Gardner’s ninth novel featuring Ian Fleming’s James Bond.

    Bond is bored sitting at his desk, pushing paper; and feels that M has let him down, has left him to rot. When M suggests that he take a holiday, Bond is displeased but, in the Californian hills, he catches sight of a man who intrigues him immediately. His name is Brokenclaw Lee.

    When Bond discovers that the enigmatic Brokenclaw heads a vast congolmerate of underworld operations, he wonders if M’s idea that he should go on a holiday was the clear-cut proposal it seemed. What has happened to the five scientists whose highly sensitive, secret work is crucial to the security of the American state? Why are Bond’s investigations compelling American agents to handle him as though he were a common criminal?

    As ever, Bond finds a worthy partner in a beautiful female agent – Chi-Chi. This time, however, he has the support of the indomitable Ed Rushia of the CIA. Just how much help will these two be able to give Bond when he is pitted against one of America’s most powerful villains?

    Brokenclaw is an intriguing and stimulating thriller which will delight old and new fans of Bond. It takes our hero through the slimiest parts of San Francisco to Brokenclaw’s lair, a puzzle house crammed with technological devices, to a spellbinding ending in the heartland of the American Indians.

    UK First Edition Hardback

    Trivia

    • John Gardner says Brokenclaw was one of his least favorite Bond books. The author was recovering from a serious operation (prostate cancer) and says “there was a lot of serious emotional and ill health-related baggage tired to that book.
    • Gardner modeled the character of Ed Ruisha (pronounced “Roo-sha”) on his good friend and neighbor who came to visit him while he was in the hospital.
    • Brokenclaw was the first novel Gardner wrote after moving to the USA.
    • James Bond drinks tea in the beginning of Brokenclaw, even though it’s been firmly established in other books that Bond hates tea.

    Release Timeline

    • 1990: 1st British Hardback Edition
    • 1990: 1st American Putnam Hardback Edition
    • 1990: 1st American Curley Publishing Large Print Edition
    • 1991: 1st British Coronet Paperback Edition
    • 1991: 1st American Berkley Paperback Edition

    Relationship to the film series

    • Brokenclaw: Book: Bond is tortured by heritage-obsessed villian Brokenclaw Lee in an antique Native American torture device.
    • The World Is Not Enough (1999) – Bond is tortured by heritage-obsessed villainess Electra King in an antique Turkish torture device.

    Forum Reviews

    Brokenclaw Large Print

    Large Print Edition

    I really like Brokenclaw. I think the villain is one of Gardner’s best (The two right hands are great.)

    I remember some line in it about the plot to mess up the stock markets where he says something like “the rumor was the Japanese were working on something similar.” I always felt that this referred to Tom Clancy’s Debt of Honor which was in the works at the time and that Gardner was already bracing for an unfavorable comparison.

    I put this one high up on my Gardner rankings.

    CBn Forum member B007GLE

    Brokenclaw is one of my favourite of John Gardner’s. I especially like the climax opposing Bond and Brokenclaw at the end of the book and the Indian torture sequences.

    CBn Forum member Cesari

    I thought it was one of John Gardner’s best. I liked the setting on the West Coast and Northwest – my stomping grounds. Bond in Canada (I can’t think of any other time) if I am not mistaken, as well.

    CBn Forum member dennisbolt

    Brokenclaw UK Paperback

    UK First Edition Paperback

    I enjoyed Brokenclaw, most Gardner’s just seems to blur into one another after awhile, but Brokenclaw is one one remembers well. Loved the title character, equal with the best of the Fleming villians in my opinion (Bond is drawn to getting a closer look at Brokenclaw before he even knows who he is). I also liked Bond’s visit to Chinatown, that’s something I wouldn’t mind seeing in a future film. The one thing I didn’t like about is how it seems M withholds information from Bond, and then gets angry at him for not knowing what’s going on, but apart from that, a jolly good read.

    CBn Forum member freemo

    Well, I wouldn’t say Brokenclaw was Gardner’s best, but I enjoyed reading it.

    CBn Forum member General Orlov

    Oh yeah, that torture scene is a good one. I just reread the book and the final chapter had me squirming, not an easy task mind you. I also like the beginning with Bond simply investigating out of curiosity rather than being under orders. It would be interesting to see this kind of initial involvement in the next film.

    CBn Forum member Genrewriter

    I’ve just read Brokenclaw and I got a mixed feeling about it.

    The villain is a strong character. Ok, some people might say he’s a slightly modified Mr. Big, i.e. another powerful gangster mastering another black magic. Still, he is strong. He is mysterious. And I liked the Chinese boxes construction of the house. Nice touch to the character of Brokenclaw Lee.

    The lack of double-crosses left me a bit dumbfounded, though. Even Wanda turned out to be clear! I can’t even say whether I’m glad of it or not! Accustomed to them I have grown!

    The thing that really disappointed me was the final. I agree with those considering it a bit far-fetched. Before the final scene in the village took place I’d thought this novel to be a nearly perfect Gardner Bond novel. But why the hell did Brokenclaw decide to endure this torture himself?

    CBn Forum member Grubozaboyschikov

    Interesting villain. But the remainder is inane. John’s been watching films again, and this time it’s Dances with Wolves. And The Spy who Loved Me. The wolf thing is stupid. The end isn’t a climax to the story; it’s just at the end of the book. Most of the book seems to be set in a hotel room. Traitor, yeah, yeah. The overwhelming impression created by the book is that the author was bored. Same here. A boring James Bond book. Shame. This, this really is booorrriiinnnggg. Whereas Goldfinger, that’s art. Comparatively.

    CBn Forum member Jim

    Brokenclaw Dutch Edition

    Dutch Edition

    I’ve just finished re-reading Brokenclaw, and it just didn’t leave much of an impression on me. I think I’m nitpicking because I’m getting tired of Gardner’s lack of creativity with his characters. A chinese girl named Chi-Chi, and a guy named Luk-See? Lee was actually a good villain but maybe this was a character that Gardner could have allowed to survive, for a future novel.

    The story was good, but somehow I wasn’t riveted to find out if the bad guys got away with the LORDS and LORDS DAY info. I think I know why I was distracted. I was waiting for the double-cross. Happily, there was none, but now when I read Gardner, I don’t even trust M!

    CBn Forum member Jriv71

    I’m not very fond of Brokenclaw. Brokenclaw Lee, the villian, is excellent though, as for the first few chapters which slightly reminded of Live and Let Die. But other than that I didn’t find it interesting, actually quite poorly written with a too slow tempo and action sequences that just doesn’t felt right. Some nice ideas here and there, but sadly nothing more to it. What first seemed like original and interesting was badly executed and fell flat. Too bad, John Gardner is a great writer and wrote many good James Bond novels, but this one just doesn’t work. Simply put: one of the worst Bond books, though fairly alright.

    CBn Forum member Kronsteen

    This is one of Gardner’s better books in my opinion, one of the high points in the rollercoaster ride of his later books. We have an interesting villain (something I think was a problem once in while with the Gardner books, No Deals, Mr. Bond, The Man From Barbarossa come to mind) and some good scenes such as the interesting finale.

    CBn Forum member Qwerty

    I actually really like Brokenclaw. The villain was great, the henchman, and all sorts of other things so as to not spoil things for some. It was actually my first Bond novel. I read it when it first came out, when I didn’t know there was a literary Bond.

    CBn Forum member SirMiles83

    Brokenclaw US Hardback

    US First Edition Hardback

    Guess what, I really like Brokenclaw. I realize I’m painfully alone in this (even Gardner doesn’t like this book), but it’s one of my favorite Bond books! I love the locations, the villain, the Indian torture ordeal at the end… and the book almost has a “Fleming sweep” to it. I don’t understand why this book has a bad reputation because for me it’s the best of the 90’s Gardner novels and one of his best books period.

    CBn Forum member zencat

    The Looking Back at John Gardner Series:

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    Devin Zydel @ 2005-07-09
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