CommanderBond.net
  1. …and now Q is teasing too!

    After we’ve only just received No Time to Die’s trailer a couple of weeks ago it seems the Christmas spirit has knocked at Eon House’s door and collected another gift for their fans – on top of the sweepstakes for graphic artists revealed yesterday.

    This time it’s a shorter version of the trailer with sarky comments by Ben Wishaw’s Q. From the Greek subtitles it would seem to be a version produced for that market and released early, for whatever reason. See for yourself…

    Helmut Schierer @ 2019-12-14
  2. The brightest, the best, the bold and the brave – you are needed!

    The Internet provides this fabulous ability for all its users to instantly create – and just as instantly critique the creations of others. The world of fandom often is the place where both these abilities flourish to the point of excellence – in the case of creativity – or execration when it comes to criticism. And, fairly or not, the products of the entertainment industry regularly find themselves at the receiving end of both. Cue the 007 theme…

    Even the casual observer of Bond films will have noticed a certain, well, let’s call it ‘conformity’ in the promo material of the last two films; a fact that was not greeted with the undivided approval of fans, to put it mildly. Many a fan was seen claiming, possibly rightfully, that they could do different. Even the word ‘better’ raised its head more than once.

    Well, ladies and gentlemen, you proudly can do now:

    Here’s the link to 007 Talenthouse, the place where it all happens.

    As they say, do your worst!

    Helmut Schierer @ 2019-12-12
  3. The trailer is here – the one that works…

    Without further ado, here is the one thing most of us have been waiting for eagerly. Except those few who have already seen it in August; hope we don’t bore you, gentlemen.

    All others, enjoy…

    Helmut Schierer @ 2019-12-04
  4. 20 years ago: THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH

    The third one´s the charm.

    That at least is the conventional wisdom concerning actors playing Bond in more than two films. For Connery, GOLDFINGER catapulted him and the character of James Bond into the stratosphere of worldwide fame. For Moore, THE SPY WHO LOVED ME not only saved his tenure but also the franchise, establishing him as Connery´s equal with different qualities and turned him into a hugely beloved and successful Bond alter ego who managed to give us seven films, so far the most of any tenure. And while Lazenby never even got a second one he could have rebounded from with a third one, Dalton at least starred in two great ones before his third one fell by the wayside of the dreaded MGM situation.

    continue reading…
    Stefan Rogall @ 2019-11-14
  5. Time for a title: No Time To Die

    It’s official: BOND 25 has found its title with No Time To Die…

    Helmut Schierer @ 2019-08-20
  6. David Hedison, two times ‘Felix Leiter’, dies aged 92

    David Hedison  (c) by Luigi Novi/Wikimedia

    Today we learn of David Hedison’s passing last week on July 18th. The actor died peacefully at the age of 92.

    Hedison was a prolific thespian on theatre, film and countless tv appearances. In a career spanning well over six decades he played classic Shakespeare, the lead role Captain Crane in the sci-fi series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and numerous tv shows from Dynasty to TJ Hooker in later years. He also starred in the 1958 cult horror film The Fly and 1980’s North Sea Hijack.

    Bond fans around the world know him better as Felix Leiter, the role he first played in Live and Let Die along Roger Moore and reprised 16 years later in Licence to Kill. Many Bond fans, especially from that generation, call him their favourite Leiter. 

    CommanderBond.net crew and members express our heartfelt condolences to his family. He will be fondly remembered.

    Helmut Schierer @ 2019-07-22
  7. Forty Years of Moonraking*

    Moonraker poster art by Dan Goozee (c)

    Defence of an oftentimes abused film by CBn’s Tim Williams


    Forty years ago, Moonraker was released to the world.

    As we all know, Moonraker is a silly, over the top parody and a complete embarrassment to James Bond. That’s the kind of statement you’re used to hearing about the 11th outing in longest running film franchise, all too often labelled as an embarrassing low point.

    I’m here to tell you those statements are wrong. Moonraker represents one last hurrah for the 1960s dream team who set the gold standard for cinematic spy entertainment a decade prior.

    Shirley Bassey is back, this time singing a hauntingly beautiful title song, and an upbeat disco rendition which plays over the end credits. Ken Adam returns to oversee production design with his usual futuristic flair, and John Barry composes an ethereal work of art – with the last usage of the 007 Theme that first appeared in 1963’s From Russia With Love.

    Moonraker also represents the last time the original MI6 team are together following Bernard Lee’s passing in 1981. The creative talent couldn’t be any more impressive and they all unite for this film.

    The Bond of Moonraker is extremely appealing. He’s a smartly dressed daredevil who thinks nothing of freefalling without a parachute, rappelling down cable car wires and hang-gliding off waterfalls – while previously driving a gadget laden speedboat. He’s also an investigator – breaking into a safe, donning black attire to sneak into a secret laboratory, looking through a Rio warehouse and observing plane movements.

    It is my belief Roger Moore looks his best in this film. Being his fourth film out of a total of seven, Moonraker is smack bang in the middle of his tenure. After the triumph of 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me, the Moore template was firmly established, and Moonraker wisely built upon it.


    continue reading…
    Helmut Schierer @ 2019-06-26
  8. Licence To Kill at 30



    1989. Hello, 1989? Anybody remember 1989 – no???

    That was the year a woman resided at No 10, thinking it would go on forever. But it didn’t…

    That year, Vladimir Putin allegedly used to have a merry good time at one of Moscow Centre’s prestigious fleshpot postings – second-in-command of a department of KGB’s Dresden residency. Aspiring to replace his boss in five or six years. Or maybe not…

    That year, some spoilt brat named Boris (‘Boris Becker’ they used to wind him up, cruelly) sat behind a desk in Bruxelles, on the seat of his pants still the footprint from being kicked out of his last job. His little mind darkly devoted to making an even deeper impression with his next…

    It is fair to say only Putin’s perspective has changed a lot over 30 years.

    Oh yes – and 1989 was also the year Timothy Dalton was Ian Fleming’s James Bond in Licence to Kill.

    You wouldn’t have guessed it at the time, but in retrospect Dalton seems to turn out as divisive a figure – with some fans at least – as the other three mentioned above. Opinion about him ranges from ‘the best Bond Eon ever dared showing, the closest to Fleming’ to ‘the worst thing that ever happened to the series’, with fans often defending their perception as ultimate truth, reaching for rigorous blanket statements whenever nothing less would do their rightful indignation justice, for or against Dalton.

    Amusingly, both sides often name Licence To Kill – the 16th Bond film and Dalton’s second and last – the crown witness to support their verdict.

    Now Licence To Kill celebrates its 30th anniversary on 13. June. A film that marked a definite watershed moment in the history of the franchise since it would result in the longest break between productions*. A film that tried to outdo its predecessor with significantly less budget (20 per cent); actually with a budget on par with that of 1979’s Moonraker. A film that set out to give a perfectly fine definition of the phrase ‘punching above its weight’ when it competed that summer, without much promotional help but with predictable results, against Batman and Indiana Jones. At least nobody could accuse Licence To Kill to lack aspiration or optimism.  

    continue reading…
    Helmut Schierer @ 2019-06-13
  9. CAST AND LOCATIONS FOR STILL UNTITLED BOND 25 REVEALED

    Bond producers and cast members at the Bond25 production launch in Jamaica: Producer Michael G. Wilson, Léa Seydoux (Madeleine Swann), Cary J. Fukunaga (Director), cast members Ana de Armas, Daniel Craig (James Bond), Naomie Harris (Monneypenny), Lashana Lynch, Producer Barbara Broccoli.
    Photo: Universal Pictures International Limite
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    Live from Jamaica producers Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson finally announced principal photography for the 25th Bond film which at this point still has no official title. Director Cary Joji Fukanaga presented Daniel Craig, Leá Sedoux (returning as Dr. Madeleine Swann), Naomie Harris and new cast members Ana de Armas (“Blade Runner 2049”, “Knives Out”) and Lashana Lynch (“Captain Marvel”). In addition to the returning Ralph Fiennes as “M”, Ben Whishaw as “Q” and Rory Kinnear as “Tanner” the new film will also bring back Jeffrey Wright as “Felix Leiter”. Furthermore BOND 25 will feature Billy Magnussen (“Game Night”), David Dencik (“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”) and Dali Benssalah (“A Faithful Man”). And, as rumoured extensively before, Oscar winner Rami Malek will play the main villain, promising via satellite: “I will be making sure Mr. Bond does not have an easy ride of it in this”.

    BOND 25 will be shot at Pinewood Studios and on location in Jamaica, London and Italy. Shooting in Norway, due to weather conditions, has already been completed in the previous weeks. Filming will continue in Jamaica on Sunday, April 24th.

    According to a short synopsis the story will pick up Bond after having left active service and enjoying life in Jamaica. Old friend Felix Leiter then asks for help in rescuing a kidnapped scientist, a task which will lead Bond onto the trail of a mysterious villain armed with dangerous new technology.

    Bond 25, from longstanding 007 gatekeeper and producer Eon, is being released in the U.S. on April 8, 2020 by Metro Goldwyn Mayer through its United Artists Releasing joint venture with Annapurna, and through Universal and MGM in the U.K. and internationally from April 3, 2020.

    Regular Bond scribes Neil Purvis and Robert Wade will be credited for scripting duties together with Scott Z. Burns, Cary Joji Fukunaga himself and Phoebe Waller-Bridge.

    Stefan Rogall @ 2019-04-25
  10. Bond25 Live Reveal – April 25th 2019

    13:10 (BST) / 14:10 (CEST) / 8:10 (EDT) / 5:10 (PDT) / 22:10 (AEST)

    Heiko Baumann @ 2019-04-24
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